From closing completely to re-opening under strict restrictions, Sailability clubs and centres, like so many sports organisations, have gone through eight months of upheaval.

During this time, many of our Sailability sailors have lost the unique freedom they experience when being out on the water while some others have been able to enjoy a period back afloat which has made a real difference to their happiness and well-being.

To reflect on the impact that the Coronavirus has had on Sailability we asked sailors and volunteers across the UK to share their experiences with us on camera.

 A carer who attends WASH Sailability explains that it is not just the sailing that is missed during the pandemic. “It’s the routine. The sociability has really been missed a lot this year. It’s the missing of meeting with friends and that sense of belonging to a group that you go to every week”.

Louise Rounds from Whitefriars Sailability describes the positives outcomes from having to adapt to a new routine after returning to sailing. “It’s absolutely fantastic to be back on the water. I am learning so much having to do everything myself. I do end up in a spaghetti of ropes but I soon sort myself out”.

RYA Sailability Manager Joff McGill concludes: “This video highlights just how challenging the year has been for the Sailability community and how being on and around water can make a real difference.

“Not everyone has had the same opportunity to get back to sailing. Looking ahead to next year is equally uncertain, but we are committed to listening to what people want to do, learning from what does and doesn’t work in these Covid-19 times and opening up as many opportunities on the water as the virus allows”.

To find out more about sailing opportunities for disabled people, or those that need specific support to get on-the-water visit www.rya.org.uk/sailability.